News

Mental health staff recruitment plan for England

Mental health staff recruitment plan for England

31 July 2017 | BBC News

Thousands more mental health workers are to be recruited by the NHS in England, the health secretary has said.

Jeremy Hunt said it was time to end the "historic imbalance" between mental and physical health services.

The aim is to recruit enough nurses, therapists and consultants to treat an extra one million patients by 2020-21.

But the Royal College of Nursing said the plans did not add up, and more "hard cash" would be needed if the new staff were to be trained in time.

The government said an extra £1bn already promised for mental health services in England would fund the scheme - part of a pot of £1.3bn committed in 2016 to transform provision.

Millennials: how does insecure work affect your mental health?

Millennials: how does insecure work affect your mental health?

Thursday 27 July 2017 | The Guardian

Research shows that younger workers in part-time or temporary work are more likely to be anxious or depressed. We’d like you to share your experiences

 

One in five younger graduates who are in jobs for which they are overqualified for report being anxious or depressed. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

Millennials in part-time and temporary work are more likely to experience poor mental health, a leading thinktank has said.

A new report from the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) and Business in the Community found younger workers in unstable work – or who are underemployed and/or overqualified – are 29% more likely to experience poorer mental health and wellbeing, compared to those in more permanent and secure work.

Mental health crisis services in England 'under pressure'

Mental health crisis services in England 'under pressure'

27 July 2017 | BBC News | BBC Radio 5 Live

Services for people who are suicidal or self-harming are facing unprecedented demand in England, a BBC Radio 5 live investigation has found.

Out of 39 mental health trusts that provided figures for their crisis teams, 27 had seen their workload increase - 70%.

And some had seen referrals rise by as much as 60% - but without a comparable rise in funding.

NHS England said an extra £400m would be spent on crisis resolution teams.

BBC Radio 5 live contacted all 54 mental health trusts who run crisis teams in England.

One of them, East London NHS Foundation Trust, revealed its crisis team had seen referrals increase from 7,057 to 11,368 last year, a 60% rise in demand.

 

Accommodating mental health

Accommodating mental health

25 July 2017 | HEFCE

A recent report from Student Minds recommends training accommodation staff to support mental health difficulties, as part of a whole-university approach to student and staff wellbeing.

Student mental health

Mental health is becoming increasingly central in debates in the higher education (HE) sector.

In 2015, student support services saw a 150 per cent increase in appointmentsWellbeing in the student population has been found to be lower than those of the same age group not in higher education.

We also know that approximately 29 per cent of students experience clinical levels of psychological distress, associated with increased risk of anxiety, depression, substance use, and personality disorders.

Lack of mental health support leaving children stuck in hospital –…

Lack of mental health support leaving children stuck in hospital – thinktank

27 July 2017 | The Guardian

Figures show rise in number of ‘wasted days’ spent in hospital by young patients who have been declared fit for discharge

Children with serious mental health problems are becoming trapped in NHSpsychiatric units, unable to leave because care is unavailable outside hospitals, a thinktank has said.

NHS figures show that between October 2015 and September 2016 children and young people in England spent almost 9,000 days in hospital after being declared fit to be discharged. Some end up stuck in units for several months.

NHS England did not tell the Education Policy Institute how many patients were involved in the 9,000 days, despite being asked this in a freedom of information request. But the thinktank said data showed the problem was growing.

New iHV resources to support families and children after traumatic…

New iHV resources to support families and children after traumatic events
25th July 2017

The Institute of Health Visiting (iHV) is delighted to announce the publication of new resources to help health visitors support families and children after traumatic events – such as car accidents, violence, illnesses and operations and also large-scale incidents such as those recently at Grenfell Tower and the terrorist attack at Manchester Arena.  Developed together with the Mental Health Foundation, the new Good Practice Points provide evidence-based information for health visitors to help them to support families after a traumatic event, and the new Parent Tips provides information to parents to help them to support their children after such an event.

Mental Illness Leads to Higher Frequency of Blood Viruses

Mental Illness Leads to Higher Frequency of Blood Viruses

25 July 2017 | Psychiatry Advisor 

HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C infections are more prevalent among patients with severe mental illness than in the general population, according to data published in the Lancet.

Clarissa Bauer-Staeb, MSc, from the Division of Psychiatry, University College London, and colleagues conducted a nationwide, population-based, cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of blood-borne viruses in adults in Sweden older than 18 years of age with a severe mental illness.

 

Mental Health Innovation Award Winner at WMAHSN Awards

West Midlands' healthcare sector celebrated with innovation awards

21 July 2017

The WMAHSN has celebrated the best of innovation in healthcare around the region by presenting its second annual awards, with the winner of the Mental Health Innovation Award was Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust and Midlands and Lancashire Commissioning Support Unit, for RAIDPlus, particularly the CADDI (Capacity and Demand Dashboard Information) internet-based dashboard, which provides ‘live’ patient flow information, allowing for more informed decisions on staff deployment and referrals across the Mental Health Urgent Care Pathway.

"I've spend a third of my life in and out of care - now I…

"I've spend a third of my life in and out of care - now I'm helping others"

iNews | Sunday, 23 July 2017 | by Paul Gallagher

Sarah Holmes has spent more than a third of her life in mental health services. She also knows what it is like to be sent to the other side of the country for treatment – over 300 miles away from her family in Hartlepool to be precise – due to the lack of suitable local facilities.

Sarah became one of a growing number of mental health patients sent to out of area placements (OAPs) – defined as someone being sent admitted to a unit that does not form part of the usual local network of services. OAPs have increased from 504 in November 2016, when the Government first started publishing data, to 743 in April this year, the most recent figures, highlighting the shortfall in mental health facilities around the country.
 

Half of permanently excluded pupils have a mental illness...

Half of permanently excluded pupils have a mental illness, report finds

20 July 2017 | Schools Week

Half of all pupils who are permanently excluded by their school have mental health issues, though the figure is likely to be “closer to 100 per cent” because so many are undiagnosed, a new report has found.

By contrast, just one in 50 pupils in the wider population suffer from mental ill-health research by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) has found.

These pupils are then on a “pipeline to prison”: more than 60 per cent of today’s prisoners were excluded at school, while three times as many boys are excluded than girls, researchers also found.